Film Review: Stuck In Love

Reasons to watch:

  1. Lily Collin’s eyebrows. That’s it. That’s literally the only excuse you need.

Jokes about eyebrows aside (they’re so impressive you don’t understand) this film really is a fantastic independent rom-com and more earth-shatteringly realistic than many of the ones I’ve seen of late.

The film sees a Dad and successful author struggling three years on from having been divorced. Clearly still infatuated with his wife, he regularly stalks her in an attempt of seeing her unhappy in her new relationship whilst at the same time, trying to be a good Dad to his children Rusty and Samantha.

His nineteen year old daughter (Lily Collins) is getting her own book published – but frustratingly for her Dad it’s not the manuscript he looked over. For me, this encapsulated a pushy-yet-meaning-well father/daughter dynamic; the angsty conflict between the two characters was perfectly portrayed by the actors.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ctXbDE1m7v0?rel=0]

It’s hard not to like Samantha; she’s feisty and comes out with some brilliantly witty retorts. Equally, though, it’s hard not to like Logan Lerman’s character, a diehard romantic who does a decent job of melting this ice-queen’s heart.

The sibling dynamic is well-portrayed in this film, one side that films often gloss over. There’s jealousy about Sam’s book deal, conflicted opinions over their parents’ divorce underpinned by fundamental love for one another. Nat Wolff’s character, Rusty, is a stoner-kid, artist, hard-done by and hopelessly in love with a girl in his class (seriously, he writes poetry for her and she falls for it. Yuck). She’s pretty, she’s popular, she’s perfect… right? So it seems.

Everyone has their demons. As the film documents the various holidays over the course of a year one realises how much family means and what ‘love’ really is.  With the leaves on the trees starting to turn brown, this film is definitely one for curling up to with some friends, suitably armed with snacks and Christmas-themed beverages.

Words by Beth Kirkbride

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