Tags : documentary

‘Ronnie’s’ Is A Timely And Stylish Celebration Of The Arts:

A celebration of music, creativity and nightlife, Oliver Murray’s documentary Ronnie’s is a surprisingly pertinent film that captures the importance of the arts and illustrates late 20th-century London in an alluringly bohemian light. Charting the life of Ronnie Scott, jazz saxophonist and co-founder of Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club, the film begins in a wistful, nostalgic mood. […]Read More

‘I Am Samuel’- A Raw Story of Optimism: LFF Review

Filmed over five years, I Am Samuel is a vérité-style documentary that follows the life of titular Samuel as he moves to Nairobi in search of a new life, finding a place of belonging in a community of fellow gay men and falling in love with his soulmate Alex. Facing the pressure of being truthful […]Read More

TV Review: In ‘The Rise Of The Murdoch Dynasty’, The

Rupert Murdoch is a man that everyone should know well. After all, he has single-handedly controlled the swing of the political pendulum since the premiership of Margaret Thatcher. The Australian media mogul started out inheriting just one newspaper in Adelaide, but rose to control the Sun, the Times, Fox News, Sky, the New York Post, […]Read More

TV Review: In ‘Kate Nash: Underestimate the Girl’, You Can

Kate Nash’s ‘Foundations’ defined 2007 as a year. As a ‘sleeper hit’, her debut release and the overnight fame that came with it winded the 20-year-old Nash. Born to an Irish mother and English father in Harrow, London, Nash’s first two decades of life were decidedly average, working in retail and as a waitress, wanting […]Read More

Documentary Review: Sold For Parts // Fontaines D.C.

Fontaines D.C. released their debut album, Dogrel, in April 2019 and received critical acclaim for their raw poetical portrayal of modern punk. This year, they released Sold For Parts, a documentary detailing the process of writing, recording and performing their highly-rated album.  Produced by Collective Films, Sold For Parts documents the vulnerability, rawness and emotional […]Read More

Documentary Film Review: Jonathan Agassi Saved My Life

There is something of an innocent quality strewn through Tomer Heymann’s latest documentary venture, which ultimately contrasts the film’s stark subject matter. Jonathan Agassi is the wunderkind of gay porn, an incredibly desirable but ultimately provocative star of adult movies who, at his height, was considered one of the greatest actors in porn. However, with […]Read More

Varda by Agnès: A Swan Song for a Legend of

It saddens me a little at how late I joined the party when discovering Agnès Varda’s work. It was only in the last couple of years that the enigmatic director, with her signature half-dyed bob haircut, was dropped in my lap countless times with film magazine editorials and an entire issue of Sight and Sound […]Read More

TV Review: Girls Incarcerated

New to Netflix, Girls Incarcerated takes viewers inside Indiana’s Madison Correctional Facility, e.g. a jail for girls under the age of 18. Throughout the 8 episodes, you see the inmates, or ‘students’ as the staff refer to them, work to get their lives back on track. An insightful and interesting look into the US Justice […]Read More

TV Review: Getting High for God?

BBC Three have recently released a two-part immersive documentary series titled Getting High For God? presented by actor Mawaan Rizwan. The consumption of hallucinogenic drugs in order to find God is not only explored in this documentary but is actually taken on by the presenter himself, making the programme insanely interesting for its viewership. Part 1 […]Read More

Film Review: One More Time With Feeling

One More Time With Feeling is Andrew Dominik’s exquisite new documentary chronicling the writing and recording of Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds’ sixteenth studio album, Skeleton Tree. It also takes a look beneath the surface of the richly-textured and mournful tapestry which makes up the private world of Nick Cave and his wife Susie, following the death of their […]Read More

Short Film Review: Freedom; Black Hands, White Flags

#BlackLivesMatter, a movement that seems to mentioned far too frequently for the unlawful killings of unarmed black males and sometimes females in the USA to be merely a coincidence. In Freedom: Black Hands, White Flags, filmmakers Levi E. Aluede and Daniel Modeste bring to light in just 20 mins some of history’s most important race […]Read More

Louis Theroux: Britain’s Newest National Treasure?

After gracing our screens for over 17 years with fantastical broadcasting magic, covering a wide range of topics from the world of porn, to investigating those facing impending death, it is fair to say we can now crown Louis Theroux as the king of documentaries (if such title were to exist, of course). With three […]Read More